Minutes of the Southeastern Louisiana University

Faculty Senate

Wednesday, April 7, 2004

Alumni Center

 

I.          The meeting was called to order by Senate President David Wyld at 3:02 p.m.  Recording Secretary Mary Sue Ply called roll.  Senators absent: Bouton, Brocato, Echols, Edwards, Mitchell, Noto, Ratcliff, Schwab, and Vidrine.

 

II.         Sen. Ramsey moved that the March 3, 2004 minutes be approved; Yeargain seconded.  The minutes were unanimously approved.

 

III.       Elections

A.        Senate Election Results: Sen. Ply did not have the results of the Senate elections with her, but she has been in contact with all departments who need elections.  The Visual Arts Department still has no representative on Faculty Senate.

B.         Senate Executive Council Elections:  Sen. Corbello had paper ballots prepared for each office of the Senate Executive Committee with a nominated candidate and spaces for additional candidates nominated from the floor.  The results are as follows:

1.         Senate President:  David Wyld nominated for re-election; no new nominations.  He was reelected unanimously.

2.         Senate Vice-President:  Nominees were David Ramsey and Laverne Simoneaux; no additional nominations.  Each candidate was allowed to speak for 2 minutes.

a.         Simoneaux recounted her service in Senate for 6 of her 8 years on campus and said she has enjoyed her experiences.  She jokingly reminded senators of the many Senate Presidents who have come from the College of Business, so it might be time for a change.

b.         Ramsey collegially countered in his remarks that, although he teaches in the College of Business and Technology, his degrees are in English and Communications.  He recalled that this is his second stint in the Senate, having served 10 years ago.  At that time, he was up for Senate Vice-President but was called away to the National Guard so could not serve.  Ramsey offered his services as Vice-President, but said if he were not elected, he would participate in other ways.

c.         Results of the secret ballot: Simoneaux re-elected.  Wyld thanked Sen. Ramsey for running.

C.        Recording Secretary:  Joan Faust nominated; no additional nominations from the floor.  She was unanimously re-elected.

D.        Membership Secretary:  Mary Sue Ply nominated; no nominations from the floor.  She was unanimously re-elected.

E.         Parliamentarian:  John Yeargain nominated; no additional nominations.  He was unanimously elected.

F.         Member-at-Large:  Margaret Gonzalez-Perez, Joe Mirando, and Terri Root were nominated for the two positions; no nominations from the floor.  Each was allowed to address the Senate.

1.         Gonzalez-Perez said she had been on Faculty Senate since 1998, and from 2000-2003 was chair of the Constitution and Bylaws Committee.  Now, as chair of the Facilities and Planning Committee, she is coordinating the study of the feasibility of a faculty childcare facility, a study which has included conducting a faculty survey.  She feels she has served the Senate well and has enjoyed it.

2.         Mirando has been on the Senate Executive Council for 1 year as Member-at-Large and would like to get more involved in Senate.  He hopes to move up to Vice-President and President, so he thinks it is important to start in the Member-at-Large position.

3.         Root has previously served as Faculty Senate President and wants to continue to serve, either as a committee chair or Member-at-Large.

4.         Because 2 of the 3 candidates were to be elected, the results were not announced until the end of the meeting.  Gonzalez-Perez and Mirando were elected as Members-at-Large.

 

IV.       Invited Guests

            A.        Dr. John Crain, Provost, addressed the Senate on two main issues:

1.         Budget:  because the Appropriations Committee will meet next week, Crain deferred his comments until the May meeting, which President Moffett might attend.

2.         General Studies Reorganization:  Crain gave the Senate an overview of the reorganization of the College of General Studies as well as of the related proposals coming out of the Quality Enhancement Plan (QEP) Team.  Assistant Vice-President for Academic Affairs Dr. Bea Baldwin assisted.

a.         Crain filled in the background of the changes in General Studies.  Originally, the administration explored ways to address the Master Plan 2005 with a recruiting and marketing plan to attract students better prepared for university work, in particular those with ACT scores of 24 and higher.  In tightening admission standards, Southeastern has succeeded in this effort.

b.         Even before these efforts, fewer Developmental Education classes had been needed.  When admission standards were implemented in 2000 and our focus shifted to recruitment of better-prepared students, the need for Developmental Education declined even further.  With the Master Plan of 2005 requiring unprepared students to attend community colleges, the need for Developmental Education at Southeastern will be reduced even further.

c.         Another factor is our graduation rate, which is the lowest in the Louisiana System.  The Deans Council has addressed certain issues that hinder graduation.  For one thing, about 50% of students enter Southeastern as “Undeclared Majors.”  These tend to flounder around, changing majors and having a negative impact on our graduation rate.  Many just go into General Studies since they have no hours specialized in a major.  Southeastern does not want these students just to “end up” in General Studies.

d.         It was decided to enroll these uncertain students into a General Studies curriculum and to be advised in the General Studies program, where they would receive help and guidance.  They would be encouraged to choose another major, but if they did not, at least they would be able to graduate in a viable degree program.

e.         In addition, it was decided that it was no longer feasible to have a separate unit providing Developmental Education, so these classes in math and English will go back to the departments.

f.          It was also decided that the General Studies program could better serve students by not being located in a particular college but in its own academic unit, a system which has worked well at other institutions.  Thus, all the pieces made sense together: move  Developmental Education to the departments, change the College of Basic Studies to the College of General Studies, and have a program located there.

g.         In addition, the QEP team has decided to focus on advising, which might play into all this.  This summer, we will have a College of General Studies housing the General Studies program and will have services for advising, but probably this will not be the final picture:  future decisions will be based on the QEP conclusions.  Perhaps advising will be centrally located on campus, or perhaps will be located in the College of General Studies.  Whatever the final plan, we will fit it in to our marketing and recruiting plans to increase our graduation rate.

                        3.         Crain opened the floor to questions.

a.         Sen. Neuerburg noted that the new General Studies Curriculum was in the 2004-2005 catalogue though it was not definite.  He asked if it would be pulled from the catalogue.  Crain responded that the curriculum was a suggestion but had been put in the catalogue draft so that it would be easier to change within the time schedule of printing, but now it has been removed from the draft.

b.         Yeargain asked if there were a correlation between higher ACT scores and students who declare a major.  Crain and Bea Baldwin confirmed that students with higher ACT scores tend to declare majors, but a full 1/3 of our students do not.

c.         FAC Representative Bostic offered that though undecided students might look to this General Studies degree as a way to pass, but this degree would also offer students with many talents and a diversity of interests to choose a degree that would not “lock” them into a specialized major.  She hopes, however, that the students are challenged with the curriculum.  Crain responded that the General Studies degree has gotten a “bum rap”; it actually offers unique opportunities for students to create majors and put diverse fields of study together.

B.         Dr. Bea Baldwin then addressed the senate on the QEP and what is involved in that effort.  She encouraged senators to participate in the study and give the team some feedback.  They have been meeting every Tuesday morning from 8:00-10:00.  Baldwin passed out a packet of handouts (see attachments)

 

1.         The graduation rate graph on Baldwin’s handout shows Southeastern’s rate as the lowest of all the Louisiana University System schools—23.6%.  However, these are 1996 figures, before the implementation of admission standards.  After the 4th year this year, the figures should improve.

2.         Baldwin explained that the QEP is undertaking university-wide problem-solving to show we have a process to address problems in a data-driven plan.  Six topics were discussed by 45 faculty, staff, and students, issues such as why students are not staying at Southeastern and why they are not progressing to graduation.  The top topic tended to be academic advising—not that departments are not doing a good job, but data shows that many students still have a difficult time navigating through their academic programs; they need a “face” they can turn to.  The University Planning Council had a workshop and chose advising was the problem to tackle.  Other faculty participated in a one-week institute to study academic advising; then Dr. Moffett and Dr. Crain put together the QEP team.  She directed any who would like to see what the team has done these past 2 semesters to their website--www.selu\sacs--and look under “QEP Workroom.”

3.         Also, added Baldwin, the Center for Faculty Excellence has focused academic advising, sponsoring a Brown Bag Series in the fall and spring.  One is coming up on Friday, April 23, at noon, Tinsley 103.  Baldwin requested she be allowed to bring members of the QEP team to the May Senate meeting to explain their task. 

4.         Baldwin asked for any questions.

a.         Sen. Burns asked what type of advising the QEP is seeking.  Baldwin explained this is not just course scheduling but a larger picture.  Burns queried whether students want to “hook on” someone to guide them.  Baldwin responded that she could not specify until the QEP finishes their task.

b.         Sen. Ply commented that she has been unable to make the Brown Bag programs because she has been advising.  She added that our dismal graduation rates will be even worse when our admission standards tighten even more and students come to Southeastern from community colleges—if they do not enter as freshmen, they will not be counted in our graduation rate.

c.         Sen. Lew asked if students are expected to take responsibility in advising.  Her students come at the last minute to get advised so cannot receive “quality” time.

d.         Sen. Ramsey suggested one uncontrollable factor is students thinking of Southeastern as a junior college and enter, planning to leave in 2 years.  Shouldn’t we measure where the students are in 6 years—did they finish somewhere else in the La. System?  Baldwin responded that the state does look at students who graduated anywhere in Louisiana, but that is a state rate, not Southeastern’s.  Unfortunately, the individual university’s statistics are the ones external agencies look at, not the state rate.  So our focus is how to make students more successful at Southeastern.

e.         Sen. Bonnette queried whether undeclared majors have a lower graduation rate.  Baldwin answered yes, but not substantially.  Mostly they come, flounder, and get frustrated.

f.          Sen. Nelson inquired how many declare a major upon entering and do not change their major.  Baldwin said less than 10% accomplish this.  Nelson reasoned that perhaps it is not good to push these students into a major.  If the QEP plan proposes early help for these students, it may help them to select a major that is right for them.  Sen. Titard agreed.

g.         Sen. Bancroft asked if Dr. Baldwin found a relationship between the number of hours students scheduled per semester and retention rate.  Baldwin responded that the stats consider only full time freshmen.

h.         Sen. Boulahanis inquired if the statistics were an across-the-board sample; Baldwin said the statistics were not a sample but taken from the entire students population.

i.          Crain added that the picture is not all doom and gloom—we have the highest percentage of non-traditional students in the Louisiana System, and they tend to take longer to graduate.  Also, there is an issue of how these rates are calculated: lots of our students work full time so progress at a slower rate.  There are things we can’t change but some we can; that’s what the QEP is all about.  Sen. Wyld added that the Board of Regents’ system of not counting transfer students toward our graduation rate is not helping us at all.

 

C.        Chris Eleser of Junior Division was added to the agenda as invited guest.  She came to the Senate to announce the winners of the Rock and Roar department displays and presented the winners with a check.  First Place:  the Math Dept., Second: the English Dept., and Most Interactive Display: Communication Sciences and Disorders.

 

VI.       New Business:  Sen. Ply asked to suspend the order of the agenda to skip to New Business in order to take up the issue of General Studies before she had to leave for a conference.  The motion passed unanimously.

A.        Ply explained the proposed General Studies curriculum raised consternation in departments because of the proposed number of free electives.  Though the curriculum has been withdrawn for now, another action still being considered is the automatic designation of undeclared majors as General Studies majors.  Inertia being what it is, students might tend to remain in that curriculum and not move to a more specified curriculum.  Basic College did not have a degree program before, so students had no incentive to remain there, but things might change with the General Studies College.  Ply therefore presented an emergency resolution (see attachments) which encourages departments to become more proactive in talking to undecided students.  She moved adoption of the resolution; Burns seconded.  Discussion:

1.         Sen. Mirando had a problem with the third “Whereas” using the term “forcing”; the QEP totally rejects forcing students.  Ply accepted his rewording as a friendly amendment.

2.         Sen. Burns commented that he likes deadlines; after 45 hours of credit, students need to choose a definite major.

3.         An unidentified senator asked if this resolution was coming from any Senate committee; Ply responded no, but that the Senate Constitution allows for emergency resolutions if time is an issue.

4.         Another unidentified senator suggested changing “After completing” to “by the time they complete,” since students can choose before then.  Ply agreed.

5.         The resolution passed by a voice vote though not unanimously.

 

D.        [Back to III.  Invited Guests]  Steve Soutullo, Dean of Enrollment Management, passed out handouts on withdrawal statistics (see attachments).

 

1.         Soutullo related the handout for number of withdrawals to the recent Senate Resolution requesting a restriction on student withdrawals.  Withdrawals especially affect Financial Aid—a W is as bad as an F.

2.         The study found that 32% of our students withdrew from at least one class each semester, wasting 5,700 seats each semester.  The phone survey they conducted gave a good profile of our entire student population—Soutullo reviewed the information on the handouts from the survey.

3.         Soutullo reviewed past efforts Southeastern has made to reduce the number of withdrawals, including charging per drop and add.  During the fall drop and add period, 5,700 students changed their schedules, making 17,000 changes in the class rolls during the first 4 days of the semester.  During late registration period this spring, 3,400 students changed schedules, causing 10,400 changes in rolls.  Problems arise with beginning class meetings with students coming and going so much.  We have tried an earlier payment schedule so those who do not pay can be cancelled and students waiting for spots to open can get in before the classes begin; this has helped a bit.

4.         Soutullo opened the floor for questions.

a.         Unidentified senator asked why we allow registration to continue after classes start.  Soutullo replied that it is to allow students to get the classes they were not able to get at pre-registration; because students like to sit in a class before they decide to keep it, we try to give them as much flexibility as they need.

b.         Sen. Wyld added that he and Soutullo spoke about the astonishing numbers, and he proposed sending the issue to the Academics Committee.  There are policy options open to us, like determining the length of drop and add period, charging additional fees for drops, etc.  We might need Board approval, but any actions we can take, we should try.  Sen. Simoneaux moved to send the issue to the Academics Committee; the motion was seconded and unanimously approved (except for one good-natured dissenting vote—Sen. Ramsey, the Chair of the Academics Committee).

 

V.        Old Business:  Because the time was nearing 5:00 p.m., Senate President Wyld deferred all other issues on the agenda.  Because the Senate Constitution has provisions for calling a special Senate meeting if needed, Wyld proposed meeting again before the May meeting to take care of the many issues on the agenda not addressed today.  He will email senators on their availability on Wed., April 28, and will determine if an additional meeting is feasible.

 

VI.       Announcements

A.        Sen. Corbello reminded everyone of the upcoming elections for the Grievance Committee, University Planning Council, and Tenure and Promotion Committee and asked senators to consult with their departments and encourage colleagues to submit their names if interested. (See requirements attached).

B.         Sen. Lew requested that, on the announcement (attached), the College of Nursing and Allied Health be corrected to Nursing and Health Sciences.

C.        BOS/FAC Report:  Sen. Bostic referred senators to the Program Discontinuance Policy draft (see attachments).

 

VII.      The meeting adjourned at 5:00 p.m.  Possible special meeting:  April 28, 3:00 p.m.; next regular meeting:  Wed., May 5, 2004. 

 

 

Respectfully submitted,


Joan Faust, Recording Secretary

 

 

 

Attachments

Progression and Retention Rates

 

 

 

 

 

Fall 2002 Beginning Freshmen Cohort

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Original Cohort

Retained Spring 2003

Progressed Fall 2003

Retained Fall 2003

Total Retention Fall 2003

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Total

2,391

2,059

(86.1%)

588

(24.6%)

1006

(42.1%)

1,594

(66.7%)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gender

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Male

1,025

852

(83.1%)

147

(14.3%)

474

(46.2%)

621

(60.6%)

 

 

 

 

 

Female

1,366

1,207

(88.4%)

441

(32.3%)

532

(38.9%)

973

(71.2%)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ethnicity

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

White, Non-Hispanic

1,887

1,628

(86.3%)

494

(26.2%)

787

(41.7%)

1,281

(67.9%)

 

 

 

 

 

Female

1,066

942

(88.4%)

372

(34.9%)

407

(38.2%)

779

(73.1%)

 

 

 

 

 

Male

821

686

(83.6%)

122

(14.9%)

380

(46.3%)

502

(61.1%)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Black, Non-Hispanic

398

344

(86.4%)

72

(18.1%)

174

(43.7%)

246

(61.8%)

 

 

 

 

 

Female

245

214

(87.3%)

53

(21.6%)

104

(42.4%)

157

(64.1%)

 

 

 

 

 

Male

153

130

(85.0%)

19

(12.4%)

70

(45.8%)

89

(58.2%)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other Minority

54

41

(75.9%)

15

(27.8%)

15

(27.8%)

30

(55.6%)

 

 

 

 

 

Female

24

21

(87.5%)

10

(41.7%)

6

(25.0%)

16

(66.7%)

 

 

 

 

 

Male

30

20

(66.7%)

5

(16.7%)

9

(30.0%)

14

(46.7%)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Unknown

52

46

(88.5%)

7

(13.5%)

30

(57.7%)

37

(71.2%)

 

 

 

 

 

Female

31

30

(96.8%)

6

(19.4%)

15

(48.4%)

21

(67.7%)

 

 

 

 

 

Male

21

16

(76.2%)

1

(4.8%)

15

(71.4%)

16

(76.2%)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Age*

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Under 25

2,320

1,995

(86.0%)

570

(24.6%)

973

(41.9%)

1,543

(66.5%)

 

 

 

 

 

25 or Older

71

64

(90.1%)

18

(25.4%)

33

(46.5%)

51

(71.8%)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ACT Composite

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Not Available

13

10

(76.9%)

3

(23.1%)

6

(46.2%)

9

(69.2%)

 

 

 

 

 

17 or Below

600

504

(84.0%)

69

(11.5%)

299

(49.8%)

368

(61.3%)

 

 

 

 

 

18-19

479

394

(82.3%)

88

(18.4%)

215

(44.9%)

303

(63.3%)

 

 

 

 

 

20-23

1,011

895

(88.5%)

309

(30.6%)

406

(40.2%)

715

(70.7%)

 

 

 

 

 

24 or Higher

288

256

(88.9%)

118

(41.0%)

80

(27.8%)

198

(68.8%)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Campus Housing*

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On-Campus

594

513

(86.4%)

146

(24.6%)

241

(40.6%)

387

(65.2%)

 

 

 

 

 

Off-Campus

1,797

1,546

(86.0%)

442

(24.6%)

765

(42.6%)

1,207

(67.2%)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Course Location*

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

On-Campus

1,973

1,707

(86.5%)

484

(24.5%)

846

(42.9%)

1,330

(67.4%)

 

 

 

 

 

Off-Campus

1

0

(0.0%)

0

(0.0%)

0

(0.0%)

0

(0.0%)

 

 

 

 

 

Both

417

352

(84.4%)

104

(24.9%)

160

(38.4%)

264

(63.3%)

 

 

 

 

 

* Based on student's first semester

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Note: Based on IPEDS definition of first-time, full-time, degree-seeking freshmen

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

           Progression means the student was enrolled that semester at the next classification, I.e. Sophomore in year 2, Junior in year 3, and Senior in year 4

 

 

University of Louisiana System Institutions

IPEDS Graduation Rates for the Fall 1996 Cohort

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Institution Name

1996 Cohort

Total Number of Completers

Graduation Rate

Grambling State University

1,091

320

29.3%

Louisiana Tech University

1,279

629

49.2%

McNeese State University

1,357

359

26.5%

Nicholls State University

1,008

255

25.3%

Northwestern State University of Louisiana

1,480

424

28.6%

Southeastern Louisiana University

2,337

552

23.6%

University of Louisiana at Lafayette

2,674

811

30.3%

University of Louisiana at Monroe

1,816

521

28.7%

 

 

 

 

Notes: Data is from the IPEDS Peer Analysis System.

The graduation rate reflects total number of completers within 150% of time.

 

 

Quality Enhancement Plan Team

2003-2004

 

                                                 

NAME

DEPARTMENT

Golding, Tena, Chair

Mathematics & Director, Center for Faculty Excellence

Finley-Stansbury, Kim

Visual Arts

Doucette, Al

College of Arts & Sciences

Koch, Dave

Administrative Computing Services

Soutullo, Steve

Enrollment Management

Stoehr, Roxanne

Communication Sciences & Disorders

Titard, Pierre

Accounting

Wood, Frances

Junior Division

Mirando, Joe

Communications

Allen, Barbara

College of Basic Studies

Didier, Jackie

Human Development

Louth, Richard

English

Magendie, Carol

Student Affairs

Neuerburg, Kent

Mathematics

Poche, Paulette

Records & Registration

Settoon, Randy

Management

Smith, Lori

Library

Hall, Michelle, ex-officio

Institutional Research

Baldwin, Beatrice, ex-officio

SACS Liaison

 

 

Quality Enhancement Plan Team

Meeting Agenda

 

 

September 15, 2003

McGehee Hall Conference Room

2:00 to 4:00 pm

 

 

 

l         Welcome and Charge to the Team – Dr. John Crain 

 

l                  SACS Overview and Timeline for Completion of Tasks – Dr. Beatrice Baldwin

 

l                  Review of Quality Enhancement Plan requirements – Dr. Beatrice Baldwin

 

l                  Action plans for Advising – From the Retention & Progression Plan – Dr. Tena Golding

 

l                  ITPE Update – What’s Been Happening So Far? – Dr. Tena Golding

 

l         Assignment of Team members to Best Practices Subcommittee and

Current State Subcommittee – Dr. Tena Golding

 

 

Goal:               To implement a model for quality student academic advising at Southeastern that leads to increased student retention and progression.

 

Charge:          

 

1)   To thoroughly investigate the current state of academic advising on Southeastern’s campus and the status of best practices for University academic advising

2)      To use the information to recommend a model for quality student academic advising

3)      To plan for the implementation of the model on a pilot basis for 2004-2005, expanding the implementation to the entire campus by 2005-2006

4)      To record the actions and plans of the QEP Team in the required format for submission to the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS) as part of the University’s reaffirmation of accreditation

 

 

 

FACULTY SENATE RESOLUTION 03-04-18

UNDECIDED MAJORS

 

 

WHEREAS Southeastern Louisiana University currently has a code (UND) for undecided majors, who are advised within the Basic College, a unit which currently offers no degree programs, and

 

WHEREAS part of the plans for the new General Studies College entails doing away with the undecided (UND) option and automatically placing such students in the General Studies curriculum (GENS), and

 

WHEREAS, designating students as GENS will encourage them to stay in that elective-filled curriculum, rather than selecting a major within a discipline, as well as possible minors;

 

NOW BE IT THEREFORE RESOLVED that the Faculty Senate of Southeastern Louisiana University strongly recommend that the Provost instruct Admissions Office personnel to retain the UND code for undecided students and not automatically designate them as GENS;

 

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED THAT the Senate recommend that, by the time the student has completed 45 credits (e.g., the 39 hours of Regent’s General Education core courses plus CPL 104, but not including orientation and transitional education courses), UND majors would meet with their advisors in the General College, select a major curriculum, complete the change-of-major form, and carry their files to the new departments;

 

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED THAT the Senate recommend that the advising program within the College of General Studies include opportunities for representatives from the major departments to meet with UND majors to discuss options for careers and/or graduate study.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                                Course Withdrawal Survey

 

                                Southeastern Louisiana University

 

                    Office of Institutional Research and Assessment

 

                                                      May 2003

 



In the Spring of 2003, a telephone survey was conducted in order to provide a better understanding of why students withdraw from courses, and what steps Southeastern could take to minimize course withdrawals.  The survey was conducted by the Office of Institutional Research and Assessment between April 1 and April 17.

 

Participants

 

The participants in this survey were 454 undergraduate students who withdrew from a course during Spring 2003.  The sample was stratified by college, gender, classification, standing, full vs. part time, and when they withdrew (prior to March 5, between March 5 and March 14, and after March 14).  The refusal rate was approximately 5% (24 of the 478 students contacted refused to respond to the survey).

 

Fifty-eight percent (58%, n=265) of the respondents were female, and 42% (n=189) were male.  Seventy-six percent (76%, n=347) were White, Non-Hispanic, 19% (n=87) were Black, Non-Hispanic, 3% (n=12) were Hispanic, .4% (n=2) were Asian/Pacific Islander, and 1% had an unknown race.

 

Ninety-five percent (95%, n=432) were enrolled as full-time students, and 5% (n=22) were enrolled as part-time students.  On average, the respondents were enrolled for 14.5 hours prior to withdrawing from the course.  The average cumulative GPA was 2.276 and the average ACT composite score was 19.4.  The majority of the respondents (70%, n=320) were 23 or younger, with the average age being 23.0.  The majority of respondents (37%) were freshmen, 25% were sophomores, 20% were juniors, and 19% were seniors.

 

Instrument

 

The survey contained five sections.  The first asked whether they had participated in early registration.  The second question asked how long after they decided to withdraw from a class did they officially withdraw.  The third question gave a list of fourteen possible reasons why a student might withdraw from a course and asked participants to rate whether it was a major reason, a minor reason, or not a reason at all.  This section included items such as: course was too difficult for me, did not like the instructor, and realized after classes started that I didn=t need the course.  The fourth question asked if there was any other reason they might have withdrawn from the course.  The final question asked how effective six potential policy changes would be in discouraging them to withdraw from a course.  The entire survey can be found in Appendix C.

 

Results

 

The majority of the respondents, 68.7% participated in Spring Early Registration during Fall 2003.  Participants were asked when they officially withdrew from the course.  Slightly more than half (51.5%) indicated that they officially withdrew from class right after they decided to withdraw, while 48.5% indicated they stopped attending and withdrew later.  The 220 students who indicated they withdrew later were then asked how long it was between the time they stopped attending and the time they officially withdrew.  Almost 10%, (9.6%) were unsure of how long they waited before officially withdrawing.  Below is the length of time the remaining respondents indicated they waited:

 

1 Week or less - 28.3%

2 Weeks - 31.0%

3 Weeks - 10.5%

4 Weeks - 13.2%

5-6 Weeks - 2.3%

7 Weeks (went the first week of class, waited to drop until last week) - 5.0%

 

Respondents were then presented with a list of potential reasons students withdraw from a class, and were asked to indicate whether each was a Major Reason, a Minor Reason, or Not a Reason for their withdrawing from class.  The main reason students indicated they dropped a course was because they were doing poorly in the class.  The least likely reason for a student to drop was because they were saving a seat for a friend.  Table 1 provides the reasons presented, and the percent of students who endorsed each as a Major Reason, a Minor Reason, or Not a Reason for their withdrawing from class.

 

                                                                        Table 1

                                             Reasons for Withdrawing from a Course

 

 

 

 

Not a Reason

 

Minor Reason

 

Major Reason

 

Was doing poorly in the class

 

56.2%

 

16.7%

 

27.1%

 

Did not like the instructor

 

63.0%

 

13.2%

 

23.8%

 

Course was too difficult for me

 

61.0%

 

22.0%

 

17.0%

 

Did not have time for the class, due to work

 

71.4%

 

10.6%

 

18.1%

 

Fell behind in class assignments

 

70.5%

 

14.3%

 

15.2%

 

Thought the class was boring

 

69.4%

 

17.6%

 

13.0%

 

Registered for extra courses so I could withdraw from one

 

74.4%

 

13.9%

 

11.7%

 

I missed too many days

 

77.3%

 

9.7%

 

13.0%

 

Realized I did not have the background the course required

 

74.4%

 

16.1%

 

9.5%

 

Realized after classes started that I didn=t need the course

 

80.8%

 

7.9%

 

11.2%

 

Did not know my work schedule when I registered

 

79.3%

 

11.5%

 

9.3%

 

Did not like the location of the class

 

84.6%

 

12.3%

 

3.1%

 

My instructor advised me to withdraw

 

88.5%

 

6.4%

 

5.1%

 

Registered for a course to save a seat for a friend with a later appointment

 

97.4%

 

2.6%

 

0.0%

 

Students who indicated that they had registered for extra courses so they could withdraw from one where asked how they decided which course to withdraw from.  The majority of the respondents to this item (n=114) indicated they dropped the course in which they were doing the worst (27.2%).  An additional 17.5% indicated they dropped the one at the most inconvenient time, 14.0% dropped the one they did not need or was not in their major, 12.2% dropped the one that was the hardest or required the most work, and 11.4% dropped the course/instructor they liked the least or was the most boring.  An addition 17.5% indicated various reasons, such as the one with the most absences, the fewest hours, the term two course, etc.  All the comments students provided are presented in Appendix A.

 

The next question asked respondents if there was any other reason why they withdrew from the course.  Two hundred and ten of the respondents provided an additional reason.  The most commonly cited reason (19.0%) was due to some type of dissatisfaction with the teacher.  This included dissatisfaction with the grading, the teaching methods, and faculty attitudes and/or behavior.  This was followed by health reasons and/or family obligations, which was indicated by 14.3% of those who responded to this question.  An additional 12.4% of the respondents indicated that they dropped the course due to the time of the course, either they did not like the time of day it was offered, or it conflicted with other obligations, including other courses.  More than ten percent (10.5%) dropped the course because they felt it was too difficult, it was too much work, or they were concerned with their grade in the course. 

 

While endorsed by fewer respondents, five other categories of responses emerged.  Several (5.7%) respondents indicated that they had registered for more hours than they could handle and had to withdraw from the course.  About four percent (4.3%) of the respondents withdrew from the course because they changed their major, or decided to drop a minor or double degree.  Furthermore, 3.8% of the respondents indicated they withdrew because it was an Internet course, and the same percent withdrew because of language problems, they could not understand the instructor.  Finally, 2.4% indicated they had to withdraw from the course due to transportation problems.

 

The majority of the reasons given (23.8%) fell into a miscellaneous category, in which only one or two respondents provided a particular reason for withdrawing from a course.  All the reasons given can be found in Appendix B.

 

Finally, respondents were asked to indicate how effective six potential policy changes were in changing the likelihood of their dropping a course.  The most effective change would be to take away all Southeastern scholarships if a student has more than five withdrawals during their academic career.  The least effective change would be to charge additional tuition for more than 12 hours.  Table 2 provides the potential policy changes, and the percent of respondents who indicated it would make them more likely to withdraw, less likely, or would not change the likelihood of withdrawing from a course.  The potential policy changes are presented from most effective to least effective.

 

 

 

                                                                        Table 2

                                     Potential Policy Changes Regarding Withdrawing

 

 

 

 

More Likely to Withdraw

 

No Change

 

Less Likely to Withdraw

 

Losing all Southeastern scholarships if you have more than 5 withdrawals during your academic career

 

1.5%

 

19.8%

 

77.5%

 

Charging you a $50 withdrawal fee per course

 

1.8%

 

23.8%

 

73.6%

 

Allowing you to get only a Freshmen hang tag if you have more than 2 withdrawals within two semesters

 

0.9%

 

30.0%

 

67.8%

 

Putting a W and whatever grade was earned at the time of withdrawal on your transcript

 

1.1%

 

43.2%

 

54.6%

 

Requiring you to discuss the withdrawal with a counselor before it is approved

 

2.0%

 

54.6%

 

42.3%

 

Charging you additional tuition for more than 12 hours

 

20.9%

 

46.5%

 

31.7%

 


                                                                    Appendix A

                                How Students Decided Which Course to Withdraw From


!       Absences

!       Auditing the course

!       Chose the class in which I had bad grade

!       class time interfered with work

!       Class was not needed and was the most work

!       conflict with work schedule

!       Could eat lunch at this time

!       Did not like teacher and felt no use in trying in this class

!       drop the class schedule that I didn't like

!       drop the one that was doing the worst

!       Dropped the class that didn't go toward his major.

!       dropped the hardest one

!       dropped the most difficult one

!       Dropped the one he was doing the worst in.

!       Fit Schedule to Drop this was ? 

!       Got rid of lowest grade

!       Hasn't started the class yet, it was a term 2 class

!       He dropped because of the time of the class

!       He dropped the class he did not like the most

!       He dropped the one with the worst grade

!       He had 18hrs and dropped his hardest one.

!       I dropped FCS because it was 2 hrs and I needed to keep 12 hrs to keep my TOPS Schlr. This class was my only option to drop.

!       It was the only class I didn't like.

!       night class

!       no time for the class, time schedule

!       Not Like instructor

!       One he did worse in.

!       One not in major

!       Only one he could withdrawal from

!       preferred to drop this class because of the class schedule

!       She did not need the class so she dropped it.

!       the hardest one

!       the hardest one

!       the hardest one

!       The main one recommended

!       the one I didn't need

!       The one that fell in the work schedule

!       the one that had schedule in the night

!       the one that I didn't like the instructor

!       the one that I didn't need

!       the one that I didn't need

!       the one that I was doing the worst

!       the one that I was doing the worst

!       the one that was doing the poorest

!       the one with the lowest grade

!       the one with the lowest grade

!       time conflict with work

!       time schedule

!       Timing Conflict

!       Was the worse one at the time


                                                                    Appendix B

                                       Other Reasons for Withdrawing From a Course

!       All Instructor

!       All other classes ended at 12:00.  Did not like waiting around for two hours.

!       Became sick

!       Because everyone in the class was opposing the war and my fiancee is fighting in it and was upset about the opposition to the war I saw in the class

!       Because of the War in Iraq and France's stance on the war, he and his family  is boycotting anything french including this french 101 course.

!       Become pregnant and was too tired to go

!       bookstore didn't have the textbook anymore

!       Car broke, couldn't get a ride

!       Changed her major

!       Changed plan and did not need course

!       Conflicting with her methods class, was a class she needed for her minor and was not that worried about it.

!       Class was busy work and he did not like it.

!       Class was internet and he didn't have time for it.

!       Class was internet and she did not like it

!       Class was too early in the day.

!       Class was too early in the morning

!       Class was too early in the morning

!       Class was too late in the day.

!       classes schedule conflict

!       classes schedule conflict, would not have time for the class

!       Conflict with non-job related commitments

!       Conflict with other course work

!       Conflicts with the child and the class was too early in the morning.

!       Could not handle the 6-9 PM class schedule.  Did not like the fact it was a night class.

!       Could not keep up with the assignments.

!       Could not understand the instructor well and therefore was not getting much from the class, but will probably not mind taking the class from the same instructor as I feel I can understand him better next time.

!       Could not understand the instructor, her English was not good.

!       Could not understand the instructor, not a word he was saying.

!       Couldn't understand teaching (lang.) but he liked him

!       Course load

!       Course material extremely hard as taught

!       Death in family and child went into hospital

!       Decided not to take honors classes.

!       Did not have the grade I wanted.

!       Did not have the prequ.

!       Did not have transportation to the morning classes.

!       Did not like the way the instructor graded.

!       Did not like the way the teacher teaches. The teacher made mistakes. The students corrected the teacher and the teacher just told them do it either way.

!       Did not realize it was an internet class.

!       Did not understand the teacher. Did not like his teaching style.

!       did poor on the 1st test, there was only the final after the 1st test

!       didn't have time for it

!       Didn't like teacher at all

!       didn't like the class

!       didn't like the instructor's teaching methods

!       didn't like the video screen used in the class

!       didn't like Wednesday classes, only wanted T-Th

!       Didn't need the class because I changed my major.

!       didn't realize the work load, has 2 children

!       Didn't really need this course

!       didn't understand the teaching method of the instructor

!       didn't want online class

!       didn't want the class

!       didn't want to fail

!       Family Obligations

!       Felt that my test scores did not accurately display my knowledge. Did not like the pattern of testing.

!       Felt that some of the things told by the instructor were inappropriate.

!       Got Sick

!       got sick, it's a night class

!       Had a car wreck and hence could not attend classes.

!       Had a sub for 2 or 3 weeks (elderly retired man, She was lost in the class Her teacher was absent at the beginning, so they got a sub. He was an elderly man and she could not understand or learn any thing from him. She was always lost in the class.

!       Had other courses which were taking time

!       Had to take care of the daughter.

!       Had too many hours.

!       Had too many hours. Was taking Psyc 101 which was very similar to this course so decided to drop it.

!       has little girl

!       Hated teacher's teachings.

!       have a son, have to work, time conflict

!       have too many classes

!       He had 19 hrs and couldn't handle it. Couldn't take 2 sciences and a math at the same time

!       He had limited transportation and could not make it to all the places the instructor wanted the class to go.  Also, he did not have time for the class because of work and family.

!       He is in the army and withdrawal from all his class in case he was called to war, also he is planning on going to a different university

!       He just did not present the material well and would lecture on one topic and test on another.

!       He took Acct 200 3 times and he doesn't get ACCT he doesn't have the background

!       He was carrying two other maths and this one was not in major, too much work

!       He was working on double-degree.  The course he dropped was for those/that requirement.  He was carrying 19 hrs and this course was not required in his first major.

!       Health reasons

!       His grandmother had surgery and he had to go to N.O. a lot, and did not have time for the class.

!       Horrible instructor

!       I always register for extra classes so if a teacher or course is too hard, I can drop one.

!       I am in plays and no time for homework

!       I became pregnant.

!       I changed my major and no longer needed the course.

!       I changed my major and the class was not required.

!       I could not understand the instructor.  Foreign instructor who spoke very poor English.

!       I did not do well with the type of test format the instructor used.  All the answers are correct, pick the best one.

!       I did not follow the instructor's teaching methods.

!       I did not get the internship.

!       I did not like the instructor and she was very unprofessional.  I was late because I could not find the class and she made a big deal about it in front of the whole class.

!       I did not like the instructor.

!       I did not like the way the instructor taught the class.

!       I did not make a good grade in the mid term and as I was graduating this semester with honors did not want to affect my GPA.

!       I didn't like the instructor's method of teaching.

!       I didn't really want the class.  Someone else put it on his schedule.

!       I don=t feel like the school accommodates non-traditional students like they do the traditional students.

!       I don't have a car and my roommate dropped her 8AM class.  So, I didn't have a way to class.

!       I dropped my minor in accounting and no longer needed the class.

!       I found out a class I had previously taken would substitute for this one.

!       I got sick and the teacher withdrew me.

!       I got sick.

!       I got sick.

!       I had 10 minutes to come from my previous class on North Campus to Tinsley and I could not make it on time.  You were allowed only so many tardies by the instructor.

!       I had 5 classes and all were tested at the same time and I could not make time to study for all of them.

!       I just didn't have time for the class.

!       I originally took 13 hours.  I was taking biology and college algebra and I could not handle both at the same time.  This was my only option so I would not lose my financial aid.

!       I really didn't need the class.

!       I scheduled 18 hours and decided that was to many hours.  I wanted to keep my GPA up, so I decided I didn't need this class.

!       I scheduled 18 hours thinking I could handle it.  I found out I could not handle an 18 hour class load.

!       I scheduled on teacher and got another one.  I didn't like the way he taught.

!       I thought the class was something else.

!       I was also taking "Topology".  Both classes required a lot of work.  I kept the "Topology" course because it is offered only once every 3 years.

!       I was not sure about my class schedule and was not sure I would get another class I needed. Scheduled this class so I would make sure I had at least 15 hours. I actually got the class I needed.

!       I was sick (Ammonia)

!       I was taking 20 hrs and that was too much.

!       In Fall he registered for MWF class and then decided that he wanted only TTH classes

!       Instructor

!       Instructor did not post grading rubric

!       Instructor spoke very low, was not enthusiastic. Work schedule did not match. Thought could take the class in summer.

!       Instructor taught at too high of a level

!       Instructor was foreign and he could not understand him

!       Instructor was not at class the first two weeks and we had a substitute.  The tutoring lab was no help.  She gave a test soon after she came back.  I did not like the instructor.  She moved too quickly.

!       Instructor was not helpful.

!       Instructor was too critical.

!       It was a 3 hour night course.  Found it difficult to sit there for 3 hours and stay focused on the class.

!       It was a lab. I could not go to the lab during lab hours.

!       It was a night class and he missed a class so he felt that he fell behind and dropped the class.

!       It was an evening class and I did not like that.

!       It was an internet class and my computer was not compatible with the program the internet class needed.  So, I fell behind in class assignments.

!       It was an internet course.  I did not know the course was designed for high speed access.  It took me forever to download the assignment with a modem.  Because of this, I fell behind in class assignments.

!       It was not required class, was busy with other classes. Just took this class a fun class.

!       It was too early in the morning.

!       It was too early.

!       matter of timing

!       medical emergency with a child

!       medical reason

!       Missed 1st class, so confused with the teacher's teaching style he could not catch up after missing 1st class.

!       Missed first test and my instructor advised me to drop.

!       Mom fell sick and had to take care of her.

!       My instructor was pregnant and she would not be there at the end of the semester.  Also, I did not have enough time for the class this semester with my schedule.

!       My sister became ill and I had to fly out of town to see her.  When I got back, I dropped the classes I couldn't catch up.

!       Needed a Break

!       Needed only 9 hours of English so withdrew.

!       Needed the course for minor but thought not to worry about minor and focus on courses needed for major.

!       Needed time to prepare, since he had the first PLAB and he wanted more time to prepare.

!       Needed to keep up with chemistry class could not handle both courses.

!       Needed to take Hist 202 instead of Hist 101.

!       night class, couldn't stay awake

!       no time, the class required a lot of work

!       Nobody to watch my son as the class was at night.

!       personal reason

!       personal reason, just want to enroll in 1 course

!       Personal reasons

!       Photography - did not have the money

!       pregnant, didn't want night class

!       Professor was hard to understand.

!       Realized she had all the English needed

!       Realized their was an equivalent internet course and chose to take that and had to take care of the daughter.

!       Rode with a friend and the class met too early for her to leave for school.

!       Scheduled on wrong day by accident so never went to class. He had to have the class on TT because of work and by mistake he scheduled the MWF class.

!       She changed her major and no longer needed this course

!       She found out she was pregnant/medical reasons could not carry a large class load

!       Substitute instructor was teaching better so thought could take the class with her.

!       Teacher was confusing

!       teacher's 1st time teaching and she did not like his methods

!       the class was an internet class, never got any information nor responses from the instructor

!       the class was online, and didn't have time for it

!       The class was supposed to be in Fayard Hall, but was on North Campus.  I had to get to the class from Fayard in 10 minutes.  Then after the class, I had to go to McGehee 10 minutes.  I did not have enough time to do all of this.

!       The class was too much work.

!       The course content has changed from previous semester and though the new content was different and not very helpful.

!       The course did not interest me.

!       The description of the course in the catalog was not how the actual class was like, False advertisement

!       The first day of class was canceled and the class moved to another room for next class. A week passed before she discovered class was moved to another building, and the instructor would not work with her in making up her missed assignments. 

!       The instructor did not explain well and were not allowed to use a calculator.

!       the instructor did make not sense

!       The instructor pushed me into it. He did not tell his expectations and found loop holes to give you a bad grade.

!       The instructor was absent a lot.

!       The instructor was not teaching the course as I thought he should.  He went to fast in class.  He didn't use pictures in showing the layers of the skin.  He went strictly by his notes and not by the text.

!       The pace of the class was too fast

!       The teacher was bad.  He was to smart and couldn't relay the information in a fashion that most teachers can.

!       The teacher was rude, emotionless and graded on a 5-point scale.

!       The teacher was very uptight.

!       The way the instructor taught the course was not what she expected.

!       think the instructor didn't like my writing style

!       Though that she could not pass the class; felt it would be better to get a W rather than F.

!       Thought the teacher would be different, but was the same.

!       Time

!       Time conflict

!       Time Conflict with other personal matters

!       Time conflict, has a 2-year-old child

!       Time constraints, this class was off campus and his others were on campus and could not get to the off campus in a timely manner.

!       time consuming

!       too difficult

!       too many assignments

!       Too many classes, too much work.

!       Too many hours, most work filled class, so he dropped it, (loaded)

!       Too much assignments.

!       Too much information to learn in a short period of time.

!       Too much work.

!       trying for higher GPA

!       Wanted to take the course under another instructor.

!       Was a night class and he did not want to wait around for the class.

!       Was doing poorly

!       Was not able to attend due to illness.

!       was not familiar with calculator and needed to learn how to use it before could take class

!       Was not interested in the course.

!       Was sick had to drop.

!       Was taking 14 hours and that was too much.

!       Was taking methods courses and wanted to concentrate on those.

!       wasn't getting class

!       Would rather take American Literature than World Literature.


                                                                    Appendix C

                                                        Course Withdrawal Survey


Hello, my name is ____________ and I am calling from the Office of Institutional Research and Assessment at Southeastern Louisiana University.  May I please speak with_______.  We are conducting a survey of students who have withdrawn from a course.  According to our records, you withdrew from    Course  this semester.  Your opinion is very important to us, and your answers will be completely confidential.  This survey will only take a couple of minutes of your time.

 

1.      Did you participate in Spring Early Registration last Fall?           Y          N

 

2.      Did you officially withdraw from class right after you decided to withdraw, or did you stop attending and officially withdrew later? ASAP              Later

If later,

2b. How long was it between the time you stopped attending class and the time you officially withdrew?

 

3.      Following are some reasons why students may withdraw from a class.  Please indicate whether each reason was a Major Reason, a Minor Reason or Not a Reason for your dropping   Course  .

 

a.       Realized I did not have the background the course required

b.      Did not like the location of the class

c.       Course was too difficult for me

d.      Registered for a course to save a seat for a friend with a later appointment

e.       Was doing poorly in the class

f.        I missed too many days

g.       Realized after classes started that I didn=t need the course

h.       Did not like the instructor

i.         Did not know my work schedule when I registered

j.        Fell behind in class assignments

k.      My instructor advised me to withdraw

l.         Thought the class was boring

m.     Did not have time for the class, due to work

n.       Registered for extra courses so I could withdraw from one

if Major or Minor Reason,

How did you decide which course to withdraw from?

 

Was there any other reason you withdrew from   Course ?

 

5.      For the following potential policy changes, please indicate whether such a policy would make you more likely to drop a course, less likely, or would not change the likelihood of your withdrawing from a course.

 

a.       Charging you additional tuition for more than 12 hours

b.      Charging you a $50 withdrawal fee per course

c.       Requiring you to discuss the withdrawal with a counselor before it is approved

d.      Putting a W and whatever grade was earned at the time of withdrawal on your transcript

e.       Losing all Southeastern scholarships if you have more than 5 withdrawals during your academic career

f.        Allowing you to get only a Freshmen hang tag if you have more than 2 withdrawals within two semesters

 

These are all the questions I have.  Thank you for your time.  If you have any questions regarding this survey, please contact Dr. Michelle Hall in the Office of Institutional Research at (985) 549-2077.

 

Undergraduate Courses with Withdrawals

Southeastern Louisiana University

Spring 2003

 

Number of Withdrawals*

14th Day Enrollment

% of Enrollment Withdrawing

College of Arts & Sciences

 

 

Biological Sciences

 

 

MIC  463

2

7

28.6%

HORT 261

4

16

25.0%

ZOO  241

3

14

21.4%

ZOO  302

9

46

19.6%

ZOO  242

2

11

18.2%

ZOO  465

3

17

17.6%

GBIO 153

40

236

16.9%

BIOL 152

80

523

15.3%

GBIO 151

131

885

14.8%

GBIO 441

5

39

12.8%

GBIO 485

1

8

12.5%

GBIO 106

102

832

12.3%

BIOL 109

38

324

11.7%

GBIO 241

3

26

11.5%

GBIO 481

1

9

11.1%

GBIO 312

3

27

11.1%

BOT  205

1

9

11.1%

HORT 115

6

60

10.0%

GBIO 203

5

52

9.6%

ZOOL 252

18

189

9.5%

MIC  457

1

11

9.1%

GBIO 281

1

11

9.1%

BIOL 154

12

142

8.5%

ZOOL 253

14

167

8.4%

MICL 207

5

67

7.5%

GBIO 406

1

17

5.9%

ZOO  251

10

194

5.2%

GBIO 450

1

20

5.0%

ZOO  250

11

227

4.8%

ZOO  392

1

21

4.8%

BIOL 110

5

116

4.3%

GBIO 377

1

25

4.0%

MIC  205

3

76

3.9%

GBIO 107

14

407

3.4%

MIC  223

5

149

3.4%

GBIO 200

2

70

2.9%

MICL 224

4

157

2.5%

GBIO 341

1

51

2.0%

Chemistry & Physics

 

 

CHEM 122

52

163

31.9%

CLAB 124

34

113

30.1%

PHYS 191

40

136

29.4%

CHEM 482

2

8

25.0%

PLAB 193

21

98

21.4%

PLAB 194

16

76

21.1%

CLAB 123

33

183

18.0%

CLAB 267

7

44

15.9%

CHEM 121

36

246

14.6%

PHYS 221

4

28

14.3%

CLAB 103

50

360

13.9%

CHEM 101

71

512

13.9%

PLAB 223

3

22

13.6%

CLAB 268

7

53

13.2%

CLAB 483

1

8

12.5%

CHEM 401

1

8

12.5%

CHEM 266

10

85

11.8%

PHYS 192

12

103

11.7%

PLAB 224

1

9

11.1%

CHEM 281

1

9

11.1%

ESLB 103

11

101

10.9%

CHEM 106

16

151

10.6%

CHEM 102

32

321

10.0%

CLAB 104

21

243

8.6%

EASC 101

31

382

8.1%

EASC 102

16

215

7.4%

ESLB 104

4

61

6.6%

PHYS 222

1

23

4.3%

CHEM 265

1

62

1.6%

Communications

 

 

COMM 459

2

10

20.0%

COMM 456

2

12

16.7%

COMM 373

3

18

16.7%

COMM 353

3

20

15.0%

COMM 344

3

20

15.0%

COMM 151

10

68

14.7%

COMM 159

6

42

14.3%

COMM 291

7

50

14.0%

COMM 311

4

30

13.3%

COMM 211

164

1316

12.5%

COMM 354

2

22

9.1%

COLB 118

1

14

7.1%

COMM 418

1

15

6.7%

COMM 360

2

31

6.5%

COMM 407

1

17

5.9%

COMM 256

1

24

4.2%

COMM 375

1

26

3.8%

COMM 220

1

50

2.0%

English

 

 

 

ENGL 446

2

4

50.0%

ENGL 415

3

10

30.0%

ENGL 445

3

13

23.1%

ENGL 102

474

2139

22.2%

ENGL 315

5

25

20.0%

ENGL 292

1

5

20.0%

ENGL 122

10

53

18.9%

ENGL 431

2

11

18.2%

ENGL 332

5

28

17.9%

ENGL 443

2

12

16.7%

ENGL 303

5

30

16.7%

ENGL 395

4

25

16.0%

ENGL 351

3

19

15.8%

ENGL 322

40

261

15.3%

ENGL 230

73

478

15.3%

ENGL 101

176

1164

15.1%

ENGL 396

4

28

14.3%

ENGL 312

4

29

13.8%

ENGL 429

2

15

13.3%

ENGL 231

52

442

11.8%

ENGL 121

2

20

10.0%

ENGL 301

3

31

9.7%

ENGL 380

1

11

9.1%

ENGL 232

79

885

8.9%

ENGL 414

2

26

7.7%

ENGL 331

2

30

6.7%

ENGL 482

1

16

6.3%

ENGL 372

1

23

4.3%

Foreign Languages & Literature

 

ITAL 101

11

33

33.3%

SPAN 201

22

106

20.8%

MYTH 204

5

26

19.2%

FREN 101

27

149

18.1%

FREN 201

9

55

16.4%

SPAN 101

52

336

15.5%

SPAN 102

44

292

15.1%

SPAN 320

2

14

14.3%

FREN 202

5

43

11.6%

FLAN 402

1

9

11.1%

ITAL 102

2

19

10.5%

LAT  101

3

31

9.7%

LAT  102

2

21

9.5%

SPAN 202

11

122

9.0%

FREN 102

9

104

8.7%

ITAL 371

1

15

6.7%

GERM 102

1

17

5.9%

LAT  202

1

20

5.0%

SPAN 312

1

31

3.2%

History & Political Science

 

 

HIST 429

5

19

26.3%

HIST 497

7

29

24.1%

HIST 488

2

9

22.2%

PHIL 315

5

24

20.8%

HIST 454

3

15

20.0%

HIST 487

3

17

17.6%

POLI 407

6

35

17.1%

HIST 418

4

27

14.8%

HIST 476

2

14

14.3%

HIST 495

5

36

13.9%

HIST 449

5

40

12.5%

HIST 101

60

539

11.1%

PHIL 313

13

117

11.1%

HIST 440

3

27

11.1%

HIST 201

96

874

11.0%

HIST 493

2

20

10.0%

POLI 201

64

647

9.9%

HIST 202

87

923

9.4%

HIST 321

25

273

9.2%

POLI 424

2

23

8.7%

HIST 482

3

35

8.6%

HIST 102

37

479

7.7%

POLI 444

2

35

5.7%

POLI 202

16

300

5.3%

POLI 300

2

52

3.8%

PHIL 302

1

30

3.3%

Honors

 

 

 

HONR 312

2

6

33.3%

HONR 314

2

11

18.2%

Mathematics

 

 

 

MATH 441

11

18

61.1%

MATH 427

2

5

40.0%

MATH 350

5

26

19.2%

MATH 161

197

1090

18.1%

MATH 162

86

499

17.2%

MATH 165

28

174

16.1%

MATH 201

9

60

15.0%

MATH 223

4

27

14.8%

MATH 163

95

654

14.5%

MATH 241

115

797

14.4%

MATH 200

11

103

10.7%

MATH 160

66

655

10.1%

MATH 167

15

207

7.2%

MATH 168

7

159

4.4%

MATH 360

1

25

4.0%

MATH 267

3

79

3.8%

MATH 312

1

37

2.7%

Music & Dramatic Arts

 

 

MUS  361

1

2

50.0%

MUSA 452

1

3

33.3%

MUS  420

1

3

33.3%

MUS  354

3

9

33.3%

DNC  431

1

3

33.3%

DNC  352

2

6

33.3%

MUSA 172

4

13

30.8%

DNC  207

5

21

23.8%

MUS  176

2

9

22.2%

MUS  135

2

9

22.2%

MUS  104

5

23

21.7%

MUSA 131

1

5

20.0%

MUS  353

1

5

20.0%

DNC  281

3

16

18.8%

DNC  151

6

33

18.2%

MUS  431

3

17

17.6%

DNC  205

7

41

17.1%

MUS  131

3

18

16.7%

DNC  362

2

12

16.7%

DNC  132

6

36

16.7%

MUS  101

9

56

16.1%

TLAB 137

2

13

15.4%

MUS  214

2

13

15.4%

MUS  445

2

14

14.3%

THEA 335

2

16

12.5%

MUS  210

2

16

12.5%

MUS  123

1

9

11.1%

MUS  105

1

9

11.1%

DNC  231

2

18

11.1%

MUS  152

3

30

10.0%

MUS  145

4

45

8.9%

MUS  121

1

12

8.3%

MUS  291

12

148

8.1%

MUS  137

1

13

7.7%

MUS  151

68

934

7.3%

THEA 131

37

510

7.3%

DNC  302

3

42

7.1%

MUS  114

2

29

6.9%

MUS  112

2

31

6.5%

MUS  212

1

16

6.3%

Music & Dramatic Arts cont.

 

 

DNC  111

1

17

5.9%

MUSA 171

1

17

5.9%

THEA 231

1

19

5.3%

THEA 337

1

19

5.3%

THEA 400

1

19

5.3%

MUS  175

1

20

5.0%

THEA 234

1

28

3.6%

MUS  127

1

29

3.4%

Psychology

 

 

 

PSYC 117

1

2

50.0%

PSYC 449

1

3

33.3%

PSYC 421

2

6

33.3%

PSYC 346

9

32

28.1%

PSYC 468

1

5

20.0%

PSYC 422

5

33

15.2%

PSYC 335

4

30

13.3%

PSYC 205

2

15

13.3%

PSYC 221

7

53

13.2%

PSYC 210

11

88

12.5%

PSYC 102

16

142

11.3%

PSYC 101

116

1312

8.8%

PSYC 222

4

49

8.2%

PSYC 220

4

56

7.1%

PSYC 482

2

30

6.7%

PSYC 475

1

15

6.7%

PSYC 350

2

34

5.9%

PSYC 204

11

311

3.5%

PSYC 440

1

29

3.4%

Sociology & Criminal Justice

 

 

SOC  412

5

17

29.4%

CJ   444

1

4

25.0%

CJ   400

1

4

25.0%

CJ   204

13

55

23.6%

CJ   412

10

47

21.3%

SOC  440

3

16

18.8%

CJ   440

9

50

18.0%

ANTH 403

5

28

17.9%

CJ   495

3

17

17.6%

CJ   425

5

29

17.2%

SOC  465

4

24

16.7%

CJ   202

8

52

15.4%

SOC  411

8

53

15.1%

SOC  430

3

21

14.3%

SOC  222

5

35

14.3%

CJ   101

41

306

13.4%

GEOG 431

4

30

13.3%

CJ   205

8

72

11.1%

CJ   343

3

31

9.7%

CJ   310

3

32

9.4%

GEOG 410

2

22

9.1%

SOC  212

9

100

9.0%

SOC  234

6

71

8.5%

SOC  101

94

1207

7.8%

ANTH 411

1

13

7.7%

GEOG 131

11

170

6.5%

SOC  471

1

18

5.6%

CJ   201

4

73

5.5%

SOC  300

1

20

5.0%

GEOG 103

21

459

4.6%

SOC  331

1

22

4.5%

CJ   207

1

25

4.0%

CJ   303

1

31

3.2%

Visual Arts

 

 

 

ART  483

1

1

100.0%

ART  415

1

2

50.0%

ART  221

1

5

20.0%

ART  121

7

40

17.5%

ART  151

10

65

15.4%

ART  115

2

14

14.3%

ART  152

4

39

10.3%

ART  443

3

34

8.8%

ART  111

5

57

8.8%

ART  106

25

298

8.4%

ART  190

2

24

8.3%

CRMP 431

1

13

7.7%

ART  442

3

39

7.7%

ART  211

1

17

5.9%

ART  117

1

19

5.3%

ART  105

11

244

4.5%

ART  371

1

62

1.6%

College of Basic Studies

 

 

Junior Division

 

 

IDC  101

32

315

10.2%

FS   101

29

392

7.4%

CPL  304

5

80

6.3%

CPL  104

28

489

5.7%

UNIV 102

4

206

1.9%

Transitional Studies

 

 

TRMA 92

71

841

8.4%

TREN 90

15

284

5.3%

College of Business & Technology

 

Accounting

 

 

 

ACCT 312

13

74

17.6%

ACCT 221

15

100

15.0%

ACCT 331

8

57

14.0%

ACCT 200

69

493

14.0%

ACCT 225

45

360

12.5%

ACCT 341

4

45

8.9%

ACCT 313

4

46

8.7%

ACCT 442

1

22

4.5%

ACCT 407

2

45

4.4%

ACCT 400

1

40

2.5%

Computer Science

 

 

CMPS 120

12

33

36.4%

CMPS 161

63

222

28.4%

CMPS 280

20

77

26.0%

CMPS 257

7

38

18.4%

CMPS 233

23

125

18.4%

CMPS 234

4

24

16.7%

CMPS 390

3

21

14.3%

CMPS 335

5

37

13.5%

CMPS 105

8

60

13.3%

CMPS 479

2

16

12.5%

CMPS 235

6

71

8.5%

CMPS 110

43

600

7.2%

CMPS 481

1

14

7.1%

CMPS 309

2

31

6.5%

CMPS 383

1

20

5.0%

CMPS 293

1

21

4.8%

CMPS 439

1

27

3.7%

CMPS 375

1

29

3.4%

CMPS 285

1

32

3.1%

CMPS 225

2

82

2.4%

General Business

 

 

GBBT 231

12

26

46.2%

GBBT 210

36

301

12.0%

GBBT 351

6

51

11.8%

GBBT 123

4

34

11.8%

ECON 328

4

34

11.8%

ECON 202

55

511

10.8%

GBBT 111

3

30

10.0%

GBBT 223

2

22

9.1%

ECON 102

6

67

9.0%

ECON 305

3

34

8.8%

ECON 301

3

35

8.6%

ECON 450

4

61

6.6%

ECON 201

33

540

6.1%

GBBT 234

17

344

4.9%

GBBT 131

1

29

3.4%

ECON 402

1

29

3.4%

ECON 333

7

213

3.3%

GBBT 435

1

33

3.0%

GBBT 124

1

36

2.8%

Industrial Technology

 

 

DDT  113

5

21

23.8%

IT   264

4

21

19.0%

OSH  124

3

18

16.7%

CTEC 171

2

14

14.3%

IT   311

2

16

12.5%

IT   291

1

8

12.5%

IT   292

1

9

11.1%

IT   112

6

61

9.8%

CTEC 121

2

21

9.5%

IT   402

2

22

9.1%

IT   391

1

11

9.1%

OSH  221

2

23

8.7%

IT   111

8

95

8.4%

CTEC 201

2

27

7.4%

OSH  120

1

14

7.1%

IT   215

2

29

6.9%

IT   233

3

44

6.8%

OSH  115

3

56

5.4%

OSH  121

1

20

5.0%

IT   256

1

20

5.0%

IT   302

1

25

4.0%

IT   408

1

28

3.6%

IT   242

1

39

2.6%

Management

 

 

 

MGMT 390

3

13

23.1%

MGMT 362

11

70

15.7%

MGMT 310

4

26

15.4%

MGMT 231

50

420

11.9%

MGMT 141

6

65

9.2%

MGMT 490

1

12

8.3%

MGMT 485

2

24

8.3%

MGMT 290

25

382

6.5%

MGMT 261

17

301

5.6%

MGMT 472

1

19

5.3%

MGMT 471

8

153

5.2%

MGMT 351

17

336

5.1%

MGMT 425

7

147

4.8%

MGMT 234

2

46

4.3%

MGMT 474

11

294

3.7%

MGMT 464

8

215

3.7%

MGMT 473

5

137

3.6%

MGMT 375

2

69

2.9%

MGMT 440

2

73

2.7%

MGMT 232

3

113

2.7%

Marketing & Finance

 

 

MRKT 123

7

40

17.5%

FIN  382

7

48

14.6%

FIN  123

9

70

12.9%

MRKT 331

4

45

8.9%

MRKT 391

1

14

7.1%

MRKT 314

3

45

6.7%

FIN  447

3

54

5.6%

FIN  381

21

396

5.3%

MRKT 303

18

355

5.1%

MRKT 432

3

64

4.7%

FIN  470

2

44

4.5%

FIN  495

2

45

4.4%

FIN  481

2

52

3.8%

MRKT 443

3

91

3.3%

MRKT 435

1

31

3.2%

MRKT 475

1

32

3.1%

MRKT 444

2

69

2.9%

FIN  383

1

40

2.5%

MRKT 342

2

89

2.2%

MRKT 321

1

69

1.4%

College of Education & Human Development

Educational Leadership & Technology

 

EPSY 311

4

34

11.8%

EPSY 301

4

116

3.4%

ETEC 305

3

107

2.8%

EPSY 315

3

111

2.7%

Human Development

 

 

SW   400

2

10

20.0%

FCS  371

21

110

19.1%

SW   495

3

20

15.0%

FCS  221

4

35

11.4%

SW   101

10

96

10.4%

FCS  301

4

43

9.3%

FCS  485

3

34

8.8%

FCS  321

3

35

8.6%

FCS  223

16

188

8.5%

SW   306

1

12

8.3%

SW   201

3

45

6.7%

FCS  322

2

32

6.3%

FCS  150

3

48

6.3%

FCS  242

2

35

5.7%

SW   304

1

19

5.3%

FCS  346

1

20

5.0%

FCS  102

1

20

5.0%

FCS  251

8

177

4.5%

FCS  441

5

111

4.5%

FCS  342

3

68

4.4%

SW   305

1

24

4.2%

FCS  304

1

37

2.7%

SW   202

1

62

1.6%

Teaching & Learning

 

 

LSED 402

2

7

28.6%

EDUC 204

3

20

15.0%

EDUC 106

2

19

10.5%

EDUC 304

8

79

10.1%

LSED 401

12

120

10.0%

EDUC 202

17

187

9.1%

EDUC 472

4

45

8.9%

SPED 200

13

177

7.3%

EDUC 488

1

33

3.0%

EDUC 486

1

34

2.9%

EDUC 322

2

73

2.7%

EDUC 485

1

44

2.3%

EDUC 407

1

70

1.4%

EDUC 321

1

79

1.3%

EDUC 427

1

88

1.1%

EDUC 101

1

89

1.1%

EDUC 415

1

91

1.1%

College of Nursing & Health Sciences

 

Communication Science & Disorders

 

CSD  415

2

23

8.7%

CSD  101

2

27

7.4%

CSD  440

1

15

6.7%

CSD  411

1

16

6.3%

CSD  213

1

20

5.0%

Kinesiology & Health Studies

 

KINL 111

6

16

37.5%

KINL 135

5

19

26.3%

KIN  393

6

23

26.1%

KIN  392

6

23

26.1%

KINL 220

22

105

21.0%

KINL 103

6

30

20.0%

KINL 113

35

208

16.8%

ATHT 243

2

13

15.4%

HS   332

17

115

14.8%

KIN  436

5

34

14.7%

HS   331

4

28

14.3%

HS   133

8

57

14.0%

KINL 213

3

22

13.6%

KIN  491

2

16

12.5%

HS   320

2

17

11.8%

KINL 203

3

27

11.1%

HS   461

3

27

11.1%

KINL 110

7

64

10.9%

KINL 214